Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Science.gov : FirstGov for Science - Government Science Portal

Science.gov : FirstGov for Science - Government Science Portal

Science.gov, the "go to" Web portal for federal science information, now provides a free and convenient "Alert" service that delivers information about the most current science developments right to desktops each Monday.
Launched at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Feb. 17-21, 2005) in Washington, D.C., the Science.gov Alert Service provides weekly emails to those interested in science.

From the Science.gov homepage (http://www.science.gov), individuals can set up an account and let Science.gov do the searching for them. Each week, up to 25 relevant results from selected information sources will be sent to the subscriber's email account. Results are displayed in the Alert email and in a personalized Alert Archive, which stores six weeks of alerts results. In the Archive, past activity can be reviewed and Alert profiles edited.

Individuals can choose specific sources to monitor, or select the "All Sources" option. Science.gov drills down into hard-to-find research information collections, spanning more than 47 million pages of government R&D results. More than 1,700 government information resources and 30 databases on a wide variety of scientific topics are available - all in one place and searchable with just one search tool.
Since its launch in 2002, Science.gov, the science companion to FirstGov, has been the one-stop gateway to reliable federal science and technology information. Science.gov allows individuals to search for information based on subject, rather than by government agency.

Science.gov is made possible by the Science.gov Alliance, a collaboration of 12 federal agencies, including the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services and the Interior, as well as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Government Printing Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation, with support from the National Archives and Records Administration.

Tuesday, February 15, 2005

Kansas Traveler

Kansas Traveler
Kansas is an exciting, wonderful place to live and a fascinating place to visit. Kansas Traveler talks about tempting trips to take, unusual places to see and really weird and fun things Kansans are prone to do.

We're a quarterly print publication that's easy to read and carry along on your trips for reference or for just good armchair reading at home.

***I enjoyed the complete lyrics to the Kansas State song "Home on the Range" published in the last edition. It now holds pride of place on my refrigerator door.

We have a subscription to multiple copies of Kansas Traveler here at the library, so stop by and pick one up, or visit this website for your own subscription.

Tuesday, February 01, 2005

New Database Trial: Oral History Online



Access to Oral History Online is completely free now through February 15. No passwords are required. Just go to www.alexanderstreet2.com/orhilive. But that's not all--you can win a chance at a free yearlong subscription to ANY Alexander Street product for your institution! Look at the 8 questions selected to help you explore the database--just answer those questions online, or fax in your answers, and you'll be entered in the drawing. Visit the contest page here (http://alexanderstreet.com/contest.htm).

Oral History Online is the first and only index to thousands of English-language oral history collections around the world. Users link directly to the narratives of individuals from all walks of life, from the 1930s to the present, from all over the world. Oral History Online provides in-depth indexing to more than 2,500 collections of oral history in English from around the world. The deep semantic indexing allows users to search more than 250,000 pages of full-text interviews with approximately 6,300 individuals from all walks of life. It also contains links to some 1,900 audio and video files and more 13,500 bibliographic records. Users can search the histories in new ways, including by interviewee’s name, occupation, and other details; by interviewer; by location; by date of interview; and using other criteria – through a newly created, fully controlled subject thesaurus.

“The personal narratives are drawn from repositories around the world and relate to virtually every area of research,” said Eileen Lawrence, Vice President for Sales and Marketing. “From 11 full-text interviews in 1930 of people who remember Crazy Horse, to the 2004 audio and video interviews of Karl Lyon in the ‘Oral History of the Holocaust’ project, users will find history come alive through these voices.”

One winner will be drawn from all correct entries received in Alexander Street offices by the end of the promotion. The winner will be announced on March 1, 2005.

Please contact your sales representative if you have any questions, or drop me a line and I will get you in touch with your sales rep!



Best regards,

Helen

Helen Thompson, Marketing and Public Relations Manager
hthompson@alexanderstreet.com
800-889-5937 ext. 5 (U.S. and Canada)
703-212-7995 (local and international)
Alexander Street Press, LLC
3212 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
http://alexanderstreet.com