Thursday, March 10, 2005

Main Page - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Main Page - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Welcome to Wikipedia, a free-content encyclopedia that anyone can edit."

I'm starting to see articles in print about Wikipedia, which means I'm a little bit behind the times. There's a major controversy about this encyclopedia: everyone creates it, everyone edits it. So should it be considered authoritative? Reliable?

I'm going to poke around in a subject area I'm somewhat familiar with and draw conclusions. I invite you to do the same and respond here.

Wednesday, March 09, 2005

March eBook of the Month: "Why Men Earn More"

World-renowned gender issues expert confronts the gender pay gap and presents 25 ways for women to increase their earnings.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, women earn a mere 80 cents for every dollar men earn. Why, forty years after the Federal Equal Pay Act, do women still get paid less than the guys on the job? Why hasn’t the force of the feminist movement, affirmative action, and corporate lawsuits put an end to this injustice?

In the March eBook of the Month, world-renowned gender issues expert Warren Farrell, Ph.D. argues that bias-based unequal pay for women is largely a myth, and that women are most often paid less than men not because they are discriminated against, but because they have made lifestyle choices that affect their ability to earn. Beyond urging women to stop seeing themselves as victims of discrimination, Why Men Earn More presents 25 concrete, measurable ways for any woman to increase her pay.

NetLibrary's eBook of the Month is provided through the generous support of Amacom Books. Don't miss this frank look at workplace discrimination and the pay gap between the sexes.

Check it out through our Nixon Library Catalog.

Monday, March 07, 2005

Wired News: Library Shuffles Its Collection

Wired News: Library Shuffles Its Collection

Checking out a new iPod now applies to more than shopping trips or web browsing. This week the South Huntington Public Library on Long Island, New York, became one of the first public libraries in the country to loan out iPod shuffles. ...

...In addition, the library has the potential to save a great deal of money. Latini said that most titles on CDs cost the library around $75, whereas in MP3 format, they range from $15 to $25.

"In the end, obviously, we're literally saving money," he said. "The units are paying for themselves."

The library even throws in a cassette adapter and an FM transmitter for use in a car. Patrons do, however, have to provide their own headphones for sanitary reasons.

"I think it's a very clever use of the technology and I never thought about (using iPods for audio books) until I saw the sign at the library," Jacknow said.

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What do you think? Would an academic library find use for such? We've only just invested in audio books on CD - a small collection. Do you use them? Would you be more likely to borrow an I-Pod?

Thanks,

Micaela





Thursday, March 03, 2005

Woman's Day Magazine Contest puts you in the Library

This is kinda thrilling. I was looking for the current article about yesterday's online book club that's in Woman's Day's "Dare to Dream" column entitled "For the Love of Reading". But I got distracted by one of thier current contests, promoting family history and libraries in a unique way. Woman's Day Magazine

Discover Your Family History at the Library

In 700 words or fewer, let us know why you'd like to have the opportunity to research your family history with a genealogist and librarian. Why are you so interested in your roots? What does it mean to you? How do you think the library can help you discover your family history?

Email your entry to wdwriting@hfmus.com.

Two readers will be chosen to be meet with a genealogist at their local library and will be featured in an upcoming issue of Woman’s Day.

Be sure to include your name, age, address and phone number.

Entry period: Feb. 5, 2005 - May 3, 2005 Noon ET

etc, etc. Check the page here.

Just thought it was cool... Our databases no longer cover Woman's Day (ProQuest did for a few years) but their website is pretty fully loaded for content.

Woman's Day and Family Circle have been some of my main reading over the years!



In 700 words or fewer, let us know why you'd like to have the opportunity to research your family history with a genealogist and librarian. Why are you so interested in your roots? What does it mean to you? How do you think the library can help you discover your family history?

Email your entry to wdwriting@hfmus.com.

Two readers will be chosen to be meet with a genealogist at their local library and will be featured in an upcoming issue of Woman’s Day.

Population: One Plus 5,000 Volumes

Pop.: 1 Plus 5,000 Volumes

I started library work in 1993... well, I started school then. It was actually the fall of 1992 when I went to my daughters' new grade school in Waltham, MA, to volunteer for an hour a week just to see if I liked working in a library as much as I liked visiting one.

It was a delightful time, even when I had to make amends for the library book my #2 daughter left in a snowbank out of fear of the consequences of it being returned late. I've ever since been in favor of no fines, of making it easy to borrow, easy to return books and such. That's moved me into advocating a "Barnes&Noble" or club style library, even in the academic setting: a place to go that's not home or work or church that one can sit and read and learn and visit or just contemplate the world.

Now I must express my admiration for the town of Monowi, Nebraska and the work of Elsie Eiler, who runs "Rudy's Library." Full story here, and God bless you, Elsie!

Tuesday, March 01, 2005

JOIN A CLUB

JOIN A BOOK CLUB Online...

Join a book club and every morning Suzanne Beecher sends you a portion of a book in your email. After you've read two or three chapters from a book, she'll start sending a new book portion. It's free and you can read at more than one club. Join today and start taking a five minute reading break every day.

And she has lots of clubs, from Nonfiction to Science Fiction, from Romance to Audio.

I've been at it a few months, and now know that I've seen some great books go by, and have a place to choose new fiction for the library from.