Tuesday, January 10, 2006

The new semester begins...

Spring ’06 semester is underway with the faculty’s return to campus today. I was asked by Dr. Leann Ellis, Vice President for Academic Affairs on Thursday to speak this morning during the announcements. The following captures what I said.

Welcome, library lovers and fellow users.

I’d like to introduce my collaborator: beside me, handling the technology is Judy Bastin, our reference librarian here in El Dorado, also working evenings in Andover and as adjunct faculty this semester again, also.

When I attended the Mountain Plains Library Association’s Institute this fall, I enjoyed a week of classes in Ghost Ranch, NM. The Cottonwoods were golden, the stars brilliant, the hiking strenuous; and the workshop was pretty fair, too.

One of the best moments came as we were instructed to find a learning partner in the room. There were some awkward “chosen last on the playground’ feelings, but in the end, we all had a partner. Then, as we shared our reactions to what we’d been learning with each other, the light dawned. Everyone shared, everyone had a story – and therefore, everyone was able to process the content and learn something during these moments which happened 2-3 times a day.

So I’d like you to take a moment, and turn to a learning partner. I want to share the thrill of this collaborative learning with you with a tiny exercise. In the next one minute, please take thirty seconds each to reflect on what you are reading at home or work, and why it’s important to you….


Wasn’t that cool? Active and collaborative learning… it’ll be hard to stop sharing…



Reading is fundamental to what we do, and I’m pleased to report that our circulation of library materials is up. We have it all – books, magazines, e-books, video in DVD or VHS, music – for you to check out. Our One Book One community Book this year is “Touching Spirit Bear.”

Our database use, so important for research, is up over 25% this year. Google’s not the only thing our college students use… after adding “Opposing Viewpoints” to our database lineup, we’ve recorded over 200,000 searches this year! Which leads me to an offer – let us be your learning partners in the work of database research. We’ll each learn what’s available and find the joys of successful academic preparation. How? Call us for a classroom session, attend our workshops, or visit with us anytime.

Meanwhile, you’ll notice some laptops in the lobby today. I hope you enjoy our “Library in the Lobby.” Check your email, talk to a librarian, come and visit. We’ll be here this morning, tomorrow and also in Andover on Thursday. And you know where we are the rest of the time…

Looking forward to seeing you in the library,

Thanks.

Friday, January 06, 2006

What are you reading?

What are you reading now?

Just saw that the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library has a new blog named Papercuts. It’s going to be a good one… I liked the book reviews on it. So this morning when we had a staff meeting I started it off by asking what the library staff is reading. A couple of people are traveling, so couldn’t respond, but I know they’re reading something too…

Here’s what the rest of us are reading.

Ronda: she’s reading through the series The Chronicles of Narnia after having seen the movie version of “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” over the holidays. She’s on the fourth volume. Since January 1, she finished the romance “Snow Days” and started Rita Mae Brown’s “Catch as Cat Can.”

A lot of her future reading will be tied up with her library school requirements as she begins her M.L.S. at Emporia State U this semester: “Foundations of Library and Information Science” is her first text. Juli, also beginning her M.L.S., is starting with the “Foundations…” book as well. They’ve both peeked at “The Principles of Information Ethics” – good for them! Classes haven’t even begun yet.

Juli continues her reading for our disaster planning at work with two volumes: “Disaster Planning : an Ounce of Prevention” and “Disaster response and Planning for Libraries.” For fun she’s finished “The Dewey Decimal System of Love.”

Lonnie reads the bible in the NIV version, and is reading our One Book, One Community book “Touching Spirit Bear.” Hazel’s a bible reader daily, and has ambitions to read the Newbery Award winners and the William Allen White Award winners of the last 10 years.

I’m reading Shippey’s “The Road to Middle Earth” here during my lunch hour, “The Lovely Bones,” “Eldest,” and a Tad Williamson at home in various spots around my house. Oh, and Orson Scott Card’s excellent “How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy,” (which I have no actual desire to do) enjoying very much his understanding of what’s going on in “Literature” and genre fiction these days. Finally, I picked up the illustrated version of “The Elements of Style” at Watermark Books last week, and bought it for the library. It was very hard to put down this morning as I was logging them in!

I just finished "A Dress to Die For" which is my YMCA book - the one I read on the treadmill. Good ending, and it made my workout seem faster than usual last night.

Happy reading this New Year, all.

Singing,

Micaela

Thursday, January 05, 2006

I'm reading this...

What are you reading now?

Just saw that the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library has a new blog named Papercuts. It’s going to be a good one… I liked the book reviews on it. So this morning when we had a staff meeting I started it off by asking what the library staff is reading. A couple of people are traveling, so couldn’t respond, but I know they’re reading something too…

Here’s what the rest of us are reading.

Ronda: she’s reading through the series The Chronicles of Narnia after having seen the movie version of “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” over the holidays. She’s on the fourth volume. Since January 1, she finished the romance “Snow Days” and started Rita Mae Brown’s “Catch as Cat Can.”

A lot of her future reading will be tied up with her library school requirements as she begins her M.L.S. at Emporia State U this semester: “Foundations of Library and Information Science” is her first text. Juli, also beginning her M.L.S., is starting with the “Foundations…” book as well. They’ve both peeked at “The Principles of Information Ethics” – good for them! Classes haven’t even begun yet.

Juli continues her reading for our disaster planning at work with two volumes: “Disaster Planning : an Ounce of Prevention” and “Disaster response and Planning for Libraries.” For fun she’s finished “The Dewey Decimal System of Love.”

Lonnie reads the bible in the NIV version, and is reading our One Book, One Community book “Touching Spirit Bear.” Hazel’s a bible reader daily, and has ambitions to read the Newbery Award winners and the William Allen White Award winners of the last 10 years.

I’m reading Shippey’s “The Road to Middle Earth” here during my lunch hour, “The Lovely Bones,” “Eldest,” and a Tad Williamson at home in various spots around my house. Oh, and Orson Scott Card’s excellent “How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy,” (which I have no actual desire to do) enjoying very much his understanding of what’s going on in “Literature” and genre fiction these days. Finally, I picked up the illustrated version of “The Elements of Style” at Watermark Books last week, and bought it for the library. It was very hard to put down this morning as I was logging them in!

Happy reading this New Year, all.

Singing,

Micaela

Wednesday, January 04, 2006

NetLibrary eBook of the Month

January eBook of the Month


Absolute Beginner's Guide to a Lite and Healthy Lifestyle

Written by registered dietician Nicole Haywood and endorsed by the National Institute for Fitness and Sport, Absolute Beginner's Guide to a Lite and Healthy Lifestyle ignores the distraction of fad diets and focuses on helping readers make the lifestyle changes necessary for successful weight management.

While the goal of every diet is weight loss, Haywood argues that most diets are designed to fail because they do not adequately address all the factors related to food choices. Instead of focusing on body weight as the sole or most important measure of success, Haywood advises readers to start by letting go of the notion of perfection when it comes to health and start thinking about the process. The author won't suggest radical changes or unobtainable goals, but instead, concentrates on showing readers how to make daily modifications to their diet and activities that build the foundation for a healthy lifestyle.

Link to the book through our website or at
www.netlibrary.com